Fightin’ Words: Is dieting worth it?

Olivia Inglin
Olivia Inglin

Olivia Inglin

Reporter

The idea of what’s attractive in society has been constantly changing and evolving. People have been fluctuating between thinking curves are attractive, to thinking a size zero waist is the perfect form of beauty.

It’s because of these constant alterations that diet fads have become a popular trend in America and other countries.

While these meal plans claim to be healthy, they’re really just a semi-permanent fix that’ll eventually lead to disappointment.  Many of these thoughts circle around the idea of taking some kind of food or nutrient out of a daily diet.

For example, the Atkins diet doesn’t allow participants to eat any carbohydrates. Similarly, the South Beach diet limits carbohydrate intake, and focuses more on getting them from good nutrient sources.

The idea of taking one of the three most important energy sources from the body doesn’t make sense. Proteins, fats and carbohydrates are all essential to maintain a healthy body, so having a lack of these in a diet can’t be healthy long-term for a person as a solution.

Another popular trend in recent years are juice diets, where people attempt to get all of the required nutrients from smoothies or juices made of fruits, vegetables and nutrient supplements.

While these kind of eating plans sound sane, they can easily take an everyday activity and turn it into a chore, or even a disappointment.

Globally, the idea of food is an important source of bonding, culture and community. By harshly limiting what one can eat, it takes away from this aspect of life.

Clearly, people shouldn’t limit themselves to what they’re allowed to eat. This doesn’t mean to eat whatever whenever. The obesity epidemic in the United States and other countries show that this isn’t the correct idea to follow.

However, eating in moderation, and trying to get nutrients from pure forms is a healthier way to eat. There are diets now that focus more on eating all kinds of foods but in the correct portion.

It’s these kinds of meal plans that are better, but this is because they’re not semi-permanent diets but lifestyles.

These are the smart ways to eat. There are no restrictions on what a person can eat, which makes food an enjoyable part of life. Every person’s body and eating habits are different, so a person should look for a good lifestyle for themselves, and not a quick-fix diet someone else said works for him or her.

While eating the correct portions of food groups and making smart choices is the best way to eat, eating the occasional fatty or unhealthy food isn’t a crime.

Instead they become a reward or another simple joy of life to look forward to. Food shouldn’t have to feel like a chore or challenge when life itself is already hard enough.

The idea of a perfect body will constantly change. Trying to fit the perfect picture by joining in on the current diet fad will never make a person happy; however, by picking a healthy lifestyle of correct proportions, life can be enjoyable.

The Puyallup Post is the award-winning student news of Pierce College Puyallup in Puyallup, Washington. Copyright The Puyallup Post 2017. Twitter/Instagram @puyalluppost

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Fightin’ Words: Is dieting worth it?

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