Pierce students support service

19-6-_Page_13_supportserviceOlivia Inglin

Reporter

 

Community service is an idea that has expanded in recent years. It’ll often be a high school requirement, and if not, it’s always a great addition to a résumé or application. Many groups also encourage involvement.

Pierce College is no different from other institutions. Students are encouraged to help through doing activities, such as the food drive that was put on throughout February. Other opportunities are also present.

Currently, one of the biggest projects Pierce College students can get involved with is the Oak Woodland Restoration Project. This is a project involving removing invasive weeds from behind the Rainier building on the Fort Steilacoom campus.

This project will continue every Saturday until March 15. This is one of many projects Pierce does to help the community and the school.

To find more opportunities, students can look under Service Learning on the Pierce College web page.

Another option is the wide range of groups and organizations that always welcome volunteers. These range from homeless shelters, food banks, animal shelters and places such as the Toy Rescue Mission.

Furthermore, students at Pierce College are involved in their community in many ways. For example, Darrian Costello, social issues and service coordinator for the Office of Student Life, volunteers at St. Joseph Medical Center in Tacoma.

“St. Joseph has been extremely rewarding for me and the staff is incredibly nice,” Costello said. “I chose St. Joes because they treat their volunteers really well and hanging around downtown Tacoma is always cool. At St. Joes I work in the Family Birth Center/Birth and Delivery/and NICU. Working with babies and connecting with their families has helped me develop skills like communication, patience, responsibility and the ability to give back to my community. I have been volunteering since April of last year and I am so happy I took the opportunity.”

St. Joseph isn’t the only hospital that offers positions. Local hospitals such as Good Samaritan and Tacoma General offer ways for people to help others.  A wide range of positions offered includes hands-on medical jobs, working in gifts shops or helping people navigate the buildings.

Another involved student is Kenzie Taylor. For three years, she has been one of six coordinators in the Kids Night Out Program at the YMCA in Puyallup. In this program, she volunteers to work within teen programs, and also ends up assisting other programs at the YMCA.

“I’ve been a part of it for three years now, and my final year is about to end,” Taylor said. “I love what I do, and it’s great knowing that kids come back for months on end to be a part of something that is yours.”

Both of these establishments, as well as others, are open to all volunteers, including those under the age of 18.

Individuals are required to provide proof of their identity, and pass certain medical tests if they’re volunteering in care giving. Often, there’ll be some training, but it’s simple procedures.

While all of these activities are extremely hands-on, a person doesn’t need to devote long periods of time to help the community.

It can be done by simply donating to the food bank or a toy and clothes drive.

The Puyallup Post is the award-winning student news of Pierce College Puyallup in Puyallup, Washington. Copyright The Puyallup Post 2017. Twitter/Instagram @puyalluppost

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Pierce students support service

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