Asian Fusion Fun: New Korean-American food truck

Armani Jackson, Co-Editor-in-Chief

For those looking to expand their cultural horizons while sticking to their American roots, Burger Seoul is an inclusive and texturally different food truck perfect for every college student. Located at 1750 S Prospect St in Tacoma, Burger Seoul has spent the past year building a reputation in the community.

The aroma of garlic and pepper combined with the sizzling of pork on the grill is enough to draw anyone in initially. Customers are then put at ease once they gaze upon the red menu plastered against the striking white of the truck. With three kinds of burgers and two types of fries, they couldn’t make it any easier for prospective foodies wanting to believe the hype Tacoma has laid upon them.

Burger Seoul was opened on Dec. 12, 2015 by Young La after he returned to Tacoma from South Korea. The concept and menu comes from his original location in Korea, but were revealed to the world once again after La’s graduation from Pierce College, according to an article published in The News Tribune.

Both the most iconic and the most expensive burger offered is the bulgogier. Layered with decadent Korean ribeye, crunchy lettuce, black Seoul sauce and refreshing pickled Korean cucumbers, this burger captivates the taste buds by giving consumers a preview into the culture. It’s the seamless combination of meat and veggies that gives the burger its edge.

Traditional fast food places overpower the meat byproduct with soggy tomatoes, limp lettuce and a tangy ketchup and mustard mix. With Burger Seoul, everything is fresh and prepared with care. This was an untraditional take on an American staple, reinventing it so well that it should be its own new category. The taste can’t be beat with its $8 price tag.

The Fire Seoul is equally noteworthy and named “Tacoma’s best hangover cure.” This one is different in the sense that it’s made with pork instead of beef or ribeye.

Two defining features are the spicy Korean cucumbers and hot sauce.

Be warned: this burger is one of the hottest foods to experience in Tacoma. Even though it immediately inflames the mouth, each component has varying levels. The bun melts in the mouth, making way for the intensity of the pork. Flawlessly cooked, the pork dominates and then is quickly kicked out of power as the cucumbers make their way in. For those looking to warm up, the Fire Seoul is lit and breaks the bank at $6.

Finally, the Seoul burger which has ground beef, chuck and short rib, cheese, lettuce, spinach, onions and their famous Seoul sauce for $7. At one point they sold a vegetarian option with Korean ground beans, mushrooms, arugula, and egg, but has currently been removed from the menu. Cheddar cheese or a gluten-free bun can be added to a burger for an additional $1 charge.

A wonderful side to any of the burgers is the Seoul garlic fries. Unlike the garlic fries typically offered at baseball games, the potato isn’t overwhelmed by piles and piles of the fresh spice, and at times overpowering, seasoning. With Burger Seoul’s, the taste is subtle which adds a dimension to the fries without taking anything away. It’s the ratio of salt to garlic that makes these so addicting. They’re soft yet crunchy, creating an enchanted wonderland of texture for only $3.

A good atmosphere is as important as the food, and Burger Seoul excels. Music plays from speakers creating a fun and lighthearted energy. La dances along making the customer feel at ease while contemplating the menu. One facet that really distinguishes Burger Seoul’s customer service is their effort to please while simultaneously inciting happiness. La is eager to take photos with people or to have his photo. The truck is surrounded by picnic tables, umbrellas, benches and decorative plants to add a sense of hominess.

If someone is ever driving around North Tacoma, they should stop by Burger Seoul and experience the best mashup that’s existed since Drake and Josh.

The Puyallup Post is the award-winning student news of Pierce College Puyallup in Puyallup, Washington. Copyright The Puyallup Post 2017. Twitter/Instagram @puyalluppost

Armani Jackson
Follow

Armani Jackson

Co-Editor-in-Chief at The Puyallup Post
My name is Armani Jackson and I have the privilege to return as Co-Editor-in-chief for my second year working on the newspaper. Last year was an emotional roller coaster as I learned how to balance all my responsibilities but now I come back with an even stronger determination to serve the students here at Pierce. In June, I’ll be ecstatic as I walk on stage to accept my degree in Database Management, two certificates, one in Business Analysis and one in software development along with my high school diploma. I’m excited to deepen my relationships with those who I already have come to know, and cultivate new ones with those i have not yet has the pleasure of acquainting. I aspire to one day be a data-driven journalist, combining my two favorite yet oddly separated passions: IT and journalism. Here’s to the trials we’ve faced and the tribulations coming. I’m ready, are you?
Armani Jackson
Follow

Print Friendly

Armani Jackson

My name is Armani Jackson and I have the privilege to return as Co-Editor-in-chief for my second year working on the newspaper. Last year was an emotional roller coaster as I learned how to balance all my responsibilities but now I come back with an even stronger determination to serve the students here at Pierce. In June, I’ll be ecstatic as I walk on stage to accept my degree in Database Management, two certificates, one in Business Analysis and one in software development along with my high school diploma. I’m excited to deepen my relationships with those who I already have come to know, and cultivate new ones with those i have not yet has the pleasure of acquainting. I aspire to one day be a data-driven journalist, combining my two favorite yet oddly separated passions: IT and journalism. Here’s to the trials we’ve faced and the tribulations coming. I’m ready, are you?

Asian Fusion Fun: New Korean-American food truck

by Armani Jackson time to read: 3 min
0