Professor Wycoff to leave Puyallup campus

Daniel Pollock, Managing Editor

Students begin gathering in the Gaspard Administration Building, Room 162, at 2:15 p.m. This is English Professor Corrina Wycoff’s creative writing class. It’s a small class, only 12 students, but the group is closely knit. Wycoff takes a seat on top of a desk and the class time begins with students reminding one another of inside jokes.

But, this is Wycoff’s last spring quarter at Pierce College Puyallup. Though she’ll be teaching a few classes in the summer quarter, Wycoff will begin solely teaching at the Fort Steilacoom campus in the fall.

This isn’t the first time Wycoff has worked at Fort Steilacoom. When she first began working at Pierce in 2001, Wycoff worked part time at both campuses, and in 2002 she started working full time at the Fort Steilacoom campus.

Wycoff moved to the Puyallup campus in 2010, when the campus needed an additional English faculty member. There was a hiring freeze at the time due to the economy, so the college couldn’t hire any new employees. Puyallup requested for one of the faculty members from Fort Steilacoom and Wycoff, because of her low seniority at the time, volunteered.

“It was never supposed to be a permanent move,” Wycoff said.

Wycoff said she’s excited to work with the larger international education program at the Fort Steilacoom campus again. But, while she’s excited for several elements of the move, there are still aspects she’s sad to leave behind.

“I’ll miss the kids that I know, obviously,” Wycoff said. “I’ll miss, especially, the creative writing class that I’ve been working with a lot. I’ll miss a lot of the faculty. There’s a lot that I’ll miss.”

Wycoff’s students say they’ll miss her. Jessecah Zavala, who is currently taking Wycoff’s creative writing class, is sad she’s leaving.

“It’s really, really, really, really sad because she’s such an amazing teacher and she’s very thoughtful and she’s funny and she’s just the best teacher on campus,” Zavala said. “The fact that she’s going to Fort Steilacoom is really sad for the Puyallup students.”

Student Toni Lane, who wasn’t aware Wycoff is leaving the Puyallup campus, is upset.

“It’s kind of upsetting because Corrina Wycoff is like the best creative writing teacher I’ve had and she’s just so fun and full of energy and like really nice and just so thoughtful,” Lane said. “It bugs me that she’s leaving, so suddenly too.”

But there’s still a chance Wycoff will return to the Puyallup campus in the future.

“You never know,” Wycoff said. “If there’s a need and things get shuffled again it’s always possible.”

The Puyallup Post is the award-winning student news of Pierce College Puyallup in Puyallup, Washington. Copyright The Puyallup Post 2017. Twitter/Instagram @puyalluppost

Daniel Pollock

Daniel Pollock

Online Reporter at The Puyallup Post
I like writing. I’ve scribbled several short stories, a partial novel and one and a half screenplays. I started writing for fun when I was nine; I was frustrated with the silly mystery books aimed at my age group, so I wrote my own. The story was poorly worded and cliche’ with a rushed ending, but it was my first piece and I’ll never forget the thrill I felt after writing the final sentence. My writing was born from reading. At age 11 I read Dickens and at 13, Fitzgerald and Lee. When I’m not typing words onto a screen, or turning the tan pages of a novel, I cook. Before I was tall enough to ride a roller coaster, I cooked. Everyone I knew thought I would go on to culinary school. But for me cooking is a pastime, not a paycheck. Another hobby of mine is music. I play the piano, and (though, I’ve never actually played one) dream about owning an organ. This is my first job on a newspaper; I doubt it will be the last.
Daniel Pollock

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Daniel Pollock

I like writing. I’ve scribbled several short stories, a partial novel and one and a half screenplays. I started writing for fun when I was nine; I was frustrated with the silly mystery books aimed at my age group, so I wrote my own. The story was poorly worded and cliche’ with a rushed ending, but it was my first piece and I’ll never forget the thrill I felt after writing the final sentence. My writing was born from reading. At age 11 I read Dickens and at 13, Fitzgerald and Lee. When I’m not typing words onto a screen, or turning the tan pages of a novel, I cook. Before I was tall enough to ride a roller coaster, I cooked. Everyone I knew thought I would go on to culinary school. But for me cooking is a pastime, not a paycheck. Another hobby of mine is music. I play the piano, and (though, I’ve never actually played one) dream about owning an organ. This is my first job on a newspaper; I doubt it will be the last.

Professor Wycoff to leave Puyallup campus

by Daniel Pollock time to read: 2 min
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